FirstLife Blog

Bread of Life: Meditation on Communion

Posted by Susan Wilt on

Amazing is the love and grace Jesus showed in his willingness to go to Calvary, submit to human hands nailing him to the cross, remaining on the cross and enduring incomprehensible agony until he could proclaim “It is finished”.  

In Garden of Gethsemane, the physical and spiritual struggles Jesus faced were evident when petitioning God about what he was facing as he sweat blood. Facing physical suffering of the lashings and the cross and the spiritual anguish of being separated from his Father, God, as all of humankind’s sins were placed upon him who knew no sin.

The evening before the crucifixion, knowing that he would soon be betrayed by Judas who would sell him out for 30 pieces of silver, denied three times by Peter, abandoned by nine of his 12 disciples and be nailed to the cross, he still gave them and the future Church tangible elements of connections in the Bread and the Cup.

In ancient times, and still in many parts of the world, bread was a basic food source made from many different kinds of grain such as barley, millet, wheat, and corn.

The bread represents the physical body of Christ. When preparing for communion, I think about the physical human body of Jesus who chose to leave Heaven to walk with us on earth “…doing good and healing all who came to him.”

When eating the bread and hearing, “Take, eat. This is my body broken for you,” I meditate on the crown of thorns making small droplets of blood and the lashing of his back.

I meditate on both his humanness and his deity; the nails piercing his flesh and bones to secure him to the cross - how he endured the agony for hours before he had paid the full price for all of our sins. Jesus was not killed. He willingly laid down his life to restore what Adam lost in the Garden of Eden. “No man taketh my life. I can lay it and pick it up again.”

When taking the cup, I meditate on his pure, sinless, powerful blood washing away the sin of every person who has ever lived, is living, or will live on planet Earth - those who believe in him and confess his. “Behold the Lamb of God who taketh away the sins of the world.”

“Unless ye eat of this bread and drink this cup you can have no part of the Kingdom.” This verse leaves no doubt regarding the importance of receiving communion. Jesus is the Bread of Life! Therefore, let us praise and worship him “…in truth and in spirit”

As I take communion, my thoughts move to Jesus walking on the Earth for 33 years, his friendships with Mary, Martha, and Lazarus and his kindness, love, mercy, and grace.

Communion may be the time when we are the most intimate with our Lord and Savior. It is both a very personal experience, as well as a corporate experience of worship as a church family at First Baptist and our extended family of visitors and attenders

Even in the solemnity of communion, we experience a range of emotions and insights – a recognition that we are invited to partake of the Bread and the Cup only because of Father God’s love for the world that he gave us his only begotten son. Even in a spirit of thankfulness, we may sometimes feel sorrow that our sins required Jesus to endure such pain in order to make us children of the Living God.

What a pleasure it is when, after partaking of the Bread and the Cup, the Holy Spirit reminds us and comforts us with the joy of remembering that Jesus is not on the cross now but is risen and seated on the right of the Father.

“As often as ye eat this bread and drink this cup, remember me.” And there are so many ways to remember him. After taking communion, one of my favorite ways to remember the love of Jesus is to picture the resurrected Lord sitting on the shore of Galilee, cooking breakfast for the disciples who were rowing to shore after a night of fishing. Imagine being there with the disciples that morning and having the Son of God, our risen Savior, the True Bread of Heaven, making breakfast for you.

Rejoice! This same Jesus will one day prepare a wedding supper for us, his bride, the Church.

Maranatha! Come, Lord Jesus! 

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